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recounts the life of joseph p. kennedy patriarch of the political family that included president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's career in business and politics, which included ventures in wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you, all. delighted to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including
' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. >> thank you all. as i tell my history students -- [inaudible] as i tell my histories of it until i went to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air, the fragrance, but where foreigners in a strange way. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at a
director of the library foundation under the john f. kennedy library and museum and all foundation colleagues i thank you for coming. was a dollars a generous underwriters, bank of america, raytheon, boston capital, the boston foundation, and our media partners "the boston globe" and w. b. you are. tonight's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is preside
into the presidency where president kennedy is assassinated with no preparation at all, think of no preparation at all after political scientists say the time between election day nov. inauguration day is 11 weeks, that is too short a time for a president to get ready to assume office. lyndon johnson had two hours and six minutes in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane, ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over a
' day, february 18. >> next on booktv, caroline kennedy presents a panel discussion from the oval office and cabinet in july 1962 great tapes include numerous discussions on topics of the day, including the q1 missile crisis in vietnam. this is about one hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. i am tommy nottingham the director of the jfk library foundation. tom putnam is the director of the presidential museum and i thank you all for coming here this evening. let me begin by acknowledging generous underwriters of the kennedy form, bank of america, boston capital, global institute, the boston foundation, and the media partners. tonight's forum is a very special one for those who work at the john f. kennedy library and the same. the publication of the "listening in", which is now on sale in our museum store, was simply not possible if not for the incredible skills and talent and professionalism and dedication of our library staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has bee
was privileged to spend a lot of time talking to a lot of kennedys, it was difficult to weed as a historian, working with living people. i would much prefer to work with documents. you have to figure out what is true and what is not true. where the story came from. because the stories are all told with the same authenticity and vigor. the other difficulty about writing with the recent past is that it is not always easy or to establish one distance from it. we have a responsibility to demystify and move beyond the clichÉs about the wisdom and courage of the greatest generation. to tell a different story, but a true story. based on all the evidence we can find. the life of joseph kennedy was, for me, sort of an antique fun house mirror. which i looked at it long enough, it would reflect back to me. often in distorted form. images of events and people and places. which organized and arranged 20th century america. joseph kennedy was a invalid type figure. he was everywhere. he was born in 1888. he lived through world war i. the 120s. he lived in hollywood at the moment of transition from silen
in just a second but when we return, i would like to sort of refer to kennedy and talk about the dramatic turning point in the crisis. >> would you say that the american capitalists most were very concerned about the movement? >> the 1930's is a frightening moment and in striking world war ii than any other time in our history. >> it was a tremendous dissatisfaction right after the war in the 45 and 46 period. there are dislocations in american life and isn't it more convenient for the bosses and the owners operating and the eletes to look to reflect the american life by pointing to stalin and the communists and saying -- this is the enemy? >> of course it was delayed quickly after the progressive party debacle because the cold war. at the same time, lincoln saved the right at the corporate interests used that year fear to turn people against. at the same time with the soviets were doing in eastern europe is independent state for democracy -- >> where is the energy, the energy is in the united states. stop the strikes, stop labor. i think stalin has always been a convenient destruction fo
into the kennedy legacy and the man who laid the foundation for a whole bunch of folks in public life. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, december 12th, 12-12-12. my kids have never been so excited about a date. let's get right to my first read of the morning. one step forward, two steps back. that's probably the best way to describe the fiscal talks between president obama and house speaker john boehner. with christmas less than two weeks away, the white house is faced with the same key question. can boehner deliver the votes for whatever deal they agree on? >> i remain optimistic and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. >> but with time running out, neither side seems to have budged very far from the original proposal. the only good news about what happened in the past 24 hours, they are not publicly trashing each other's proposals. on monday the white house sent boehner a counteroffer which at beast can be incremental movement. almost on the details of the offer are under wraps. the $1.6
'd like to move forward to the kennedys and talk about the dramatic turning point, the cuban missile crisis, and then talk about vietnam. >> would you say the american capitalists were -- most were very concerned about the labor moment. >> oh, yes. >> during the '30s -- >> in michigan. >> exactly. that my point. >> in the 1930s is a key, very threatening moment, and during the strikes strikes of world wad strikes -- the miner strikes and tremendous dissatisfaction right after the war in the '45-'46 period. goes all through film noir and this not convenience for the bosses and elite to look -- to deflect the tension that exists in the american life by pointing to stalin and the communists and saying, this is -- >> of course. >> this is the enemy. >> of course, the red scare was a scare against the communist party which was declining quickly, after 1948, progressive party. debacle lost, and thus the cold war. but at the same time the american right and the american corporate interests used that fear to turn people against labor, at the same time without denying that -- when the soviets
. just click this. >> many americans say that john f. kennedy is their favorite president. now you can sit at his desk if you click this. jfklibrary.org will start you on your visit to president kennedy's virtual oval office. items on the desk are interactive links that let you explore jfk's political and personal life. clicking on the picture frame will take you to a family photo album. this link takes you to his campaign office. there are lots of videos to browse through. for example, one of his old tv commercials. >> ♪ kennedy, kennedy, kennedy, kennedy, kennedy, kennedy, ken-nedy for me ♪ >> ♪ kennedy >> ♪ kennedy >> ♪ kennedy >> ♪ kennedy >> you can even dial his phone and listen in on presidential conversations. >> with the popularity 70% now, sir, you'd break 50/50 with the republicans. >> it's a safe bet you'll find lots of fascinating facts about our 35th president. with "click this," i'm harry. sometimes it's hard to see where you're going, because you're stuck in where you are. but you have the power to change your problems... to change your life. and even though
the income then-president, that year john f. kennedy and his wife, there are leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing -- another thing that takes place on inauguration morning, and this will happen again coming is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago just half a block from where were saying there was this church, the 1:00 a.m. each church, traditional african-american church. that is where the inauguration church services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] now, all little nap here for you. things start off at the white house and move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right. there is a traditional copy of the white house the takes place. it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one president to another. it began in 1961, net was a year or allow these pictures were made available. you don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy command at the same time you have four women together, and these four women actually were the first
'reilly and his two books, killington, killing kennedy, best sellers. >> bill reilly and his writing partner, i actually interviewed 0 riley about his process, does the research, the writing, the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academic sense, very few footnotes there, where he got his information from, kind of like history is a page turner, he is promising to announce his next book which he says is going to load the world down, we will see about that. dry -- being a word. it would not be. there's a lot of personality as well. a lot of policies in his books. >> a lot of books come out on current presidents and this was no exception for president obama. american tapestry, jody kantor wrote the obamas and david maraniss's first volume of his biography, "barack obama: the story" came out as well. >> whenever there's a sitting president is a boon for publishers who can jump on a bandwagon and publish as many books as possible. it was interesting to me because it fell into the early life of barack obama from his childhood when he was a student in new york, his early organizing days
it move forward to kennedy and talk about the clearly dramatic turning point that did not turn, the cuban missile crisis and also but vietnam. >> guest: you said the american capitalist, most were very concerned about the labor movement. >> host: they still are as you know. >> guest: exactly, that's my point. the 1930's of the key threatening moment enduring the strikes of world war ii and more strikes in any time in our history. there was tremendous dissatisfaction right after the war in 45 and 46. it goes all through the film but there is just location in american life. isn't as convenient for the bosses and the owners in the upper elites to deflect the tensions that exist in the american life by pointing to stalin and the communists and saying, this is the enemy? >> host: of course, of course. the red scare was a scare against the communist party which was declining quickly after the 48 progressive party debacle for example and of course the cold war. at the same time one can say the american right and let the corporate interest you said fear i think to turn people against labor and at
and the oval office itself. john f. kennedy and the kennedy administration, not one of them talks about the relationship that byrd and kennedy established. most of us talk about the byrd opposition to the kennedy primary. once kennedy gets the nomination, byrd goes out campaigning for him. he goes down to the southern baptist in texas and they were serious for lyndon johnson being on the ticket with hannity, who was catholic. -- kennedy who wa s a catholic. both johnson and john f. kennedy won their victory in the 1960s election with robert byrd's help in north carolina and texas. the second objective -- i realize byrd is a legend. outside of washington, d.c., he is little loan, much less respected. that is something i want to correct across the country. i knew history biography would not serve the purpose. there is an effort being made to portray byrd who gave nice speeches about the constitution. there is so much more to the guy. throughout his career, he was a fighter. he had to fight for everything he got. there are some who say he never faced a tough opponent. that is ridiculous. d
kennedy" both best sellers. >> guest: bill and his writing partner, martin. i introduced bill about his process. o'riley says the partner does the research, and he does the writing. he has the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academicceps. you have to trust him where he got the information from. it's like history is a page turner. he's promising to announce his next book, which in o'reilly fashion, he says is going to, you know, blow the walls down, the biggest book in non-fiction history. we'll see about that. yes, his point, o'reilly's point is that history is treated too dryly, dryly being a word, i don't know, but it need not be. there's a lot of personality, probably more personality than policy in the book. >> host: sarah, books come out on current presidents, and this year, no expectation with president obama and mrs. obama, and ca, this tor wrote "the obamas," a reporter with the "new york times," and david marines's first half on president obama, barack obama: the story" came out as well. >> guest: yes, whenever there's a sitting president, it's a boom for publi
with his housekeeper who had fathered a son. and that led to his wife, maria shriver and president kennedy involved in everything. i think filing for divorce. city comes out with 600 pages or so. if everything arnold schwarzenegger has ever done from growing up in a time australia and the bodybuilding. pages and pages about hottie building. it is incredible -- and some is an incredible american immigrant story. he becomes a movie star and then becomes governor of california. meanwhile, this is an affair with the housekeeper about five pages in the book. and he deals with it doesn't say much, makes a mistake, regrets it in those situations. i got an interview with him on the phone friday before the book was coming out. he already agreed to be on 60 minutes and they had a lot more time. midway through the interview he said i don't -- and i cannot do arnold well. he said i don't like to read this interview is going because he thought to many questions have to do with the housekeeper, not about his accomplishments as governor. if you like arnold shorts and bigger, it's all there. it briefly ma
with george stens founder of the kennedy center honors program and the american film institute. >> president kennedy said i look forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we honor achievement in business or state craft. and that's what the kennedy center honors are. >> we conclude this evening with the stars and director of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own onion is tt they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is
. at the same time, the incoming president that year, john f. kennedy and his wife jacqueline leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing that takes place on inauguration morning and this will happen is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago, just a half a block from where we were staying, there was this church called the first am church and that's where the services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] i have a little map for you. things start at the white house and they move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right and there's a traditional copy of the white house that takes place and it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one prison to another. again, 1961 and that is when a lot of these pictures were made available. you just don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy together, and at the same time, you have the when women together and they were actually the four -- they were the first lease of our country between 1953 to 1974. i
john f. kennedy in studio with us but first. >> this is the full court press. dan: other headlines making news on wednesday, in sports the suspicions of the new orleans saints in the bounty head program has been overturned, the former n.f.l. commissioner who has handled the appeal of the participators for a reward program for hard hits and games. he said the entire case has been come tamnated byt sot the suspensions are being vacated. two of the three players have been allowed to play while their appeals have been pending roger goodell not happy. dan: williams is gone. yesterday we brought you the story to charlie sheen giving money to lindsey lohan but to a better cause. anger management star is giving away $75,000 to a 10-year-old girl fighting cancer. this, after he met her father, who is a california police officer. he told him the story about his daughter jazmin, struck his heart. gave him 75,000 bucks. how about that. it's all inauguration preparations. the joint congressional committee on inaugustral ceremonies announced the platform is will o
magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on the trumped up charges. it was a risky move given the residual racism that still tainted american life. but many analysts had concluded that the phone call attracted enough african-american votes to the democratic party that your to win a razor-thin victory to john kennedy. after the inauguration, presiden
mission ended 40 years ago. i am neil cavuto reporting from the kennedy space center in florida. it is hard for people my age to believe that most americans were not alive the last time a man walked on the moon, apollo 17 astronaut on december 14, 1972, a number of the explorers who made the trip passed away and the rest are in their late 70's and some 80 but the story sounds like something from the future, not the past. it is a story about how america was a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival, stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. it was october 4, 1957, at the height of the cold war the soviets launched a beachball size satellite that orbited the earth for an hour. >> the world may never be the same. >> in 1957 condition i was in flight school, sputnik was the dawn of the space age which was the start of the space race. america competing with the soviets for scientific dominance but in a world where america worried about missiles, science
out at the end. kennedy people make the most of the contrast. the image stuck. scholars have known for his third here's years the trendy was a clever president behind the scenes. but most people still think of ike as a congenial grandfatherly president. he was, in fact, a great president. 1950s were time of peace and prosperity. after ike got us out of korea in 1953, by threatening to use nuclear weapons, he never sent another american soldier in combat over the next eight years. after the 1950s simla born in russia's biggest partly because ike made them that way. ike was a proud man but is also modest. when he was asked how we want to become memorials, he said just to let them put me on a horse. but he was proud that in his time america was strong and at peace. by god, he wants it, it didn't just happen. thank you very much. [applause] >> him happy to take some questions. >> i found this little 50-cent paperback book in our neighborhood. fascinating book what ike did leading up to the invasion of europe in 1944. for example, he talked about at the time they call them v-2 bombers.
to in eisenhower. i mean, it hurt him historically. he didn't rebut the records. kennedys, one of the greatest hatchet jobs of all time, setting up the contract between the glam yows and old grandfatherly ike, ike didn't fight that. you know, in a way, he didn't need to. i'm sure he was -- he, you know, wanted to be remembered by history, and he is remembered. in fact, i think his place in history is getting better and better. this is the third book this year on eisenhower, but, you know, he knew himself, and he didn't have to show off, and this is a great quality in leadership. yes, sir? >> i'm curious your reflections on eisenhower and the cia? he points to the brothers, used to be comfortable with that appointment, those two appointments, a lot of -- the bay of pigs -- >> a lot of activity. >> a lot of activity. at the end, they are leaving it, and is this a judgment he makes at the end of the eight years or -- >> the legacy of action was a cia problem, not directly with the cia, but, but it is true that there's an ark here. eisenhower, because he did not want to fight conventional nuclear
and it was a time when a lot of us, my generation were inspired by jack kennedy's asked not speech, asked not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country. i devoted a long time, 35 years to national service. >> were you recruited? >> i threw myself at them. >> your book is called castro's secrets. if you would, described the cia of cuba or the secret police, what ever you worked with down there. >> one of the major findings of the book is that the cuban intelligence service beginning in the early 1960's during quickly became one of the four or five best in the world. rivaling the cia, the intelligence service on which to a large extent the cubin service was modeled on the surface. small countries urgently needing the revolution like the israeli government let was formed in 1948 urgently needing to defend themselves against all of their neighbors and the cuban revolution against the united states. the eisenhower and the penetration and the kennedy administration were determined to rid cuba of fidel castro. there was the bay of pigs from 1961, the kennedy administration hum
of thpictures were made available. you just don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy together and at the same time you have the women together and these women actually were the first ladies of the country between 1953 and 1974. that is mami eisenhower and that's ladybird johnson, there's jacqueline kennedy who became the new first lady and pat nixon who was the outgoing vice president at that time. another thing that takes place on inauguration day when there is a change in power is by tradition the of going president leaves a note for his successor. this is the note, this is the large envelope that was left in the oval office by george w. bush for barack obama. he just put it posted and then on the inside of it was another envelope that said 2.44 through 43. and then the next morning here is a picture of barack obama reading that actual no. the procession of the capitol is always a big deal as we move along pennsylvania avenue and here's a picture of exactly 100 years ago an open carriage and that's william howard taft on the right into the new president woodrow wils
complete kennedy half dollar set from 68 and the first 30 years of kennedy half dollars i break open every one of these sects. --when i sell >>host: 3 really never keep full set really. >>guest: of first 30 years of kennedy half dollars we sell for $499.and look at this499. ike dollars $160 a year susan b. anthony $32 per coin by coin,$1,264.82. this is why i have included all five of these. if you are looking for the rarest 5 kennedy half dollars a they will be issued proof or uncirculated will be these. if you want the 5 rarest government proof- sets from 1955 until 202009 it will be the green boxes. i used to be able to sell them in the day but we cannot any more. coin by the kennedys in 1998 if you are a collector you know this coin $34.50. this is $56.50.3 one is $29.75. this one is $53.50.and this one is a mere $19.95. >>host: just right there, $200. >>guest: almost $200 for the kennedy half dollars. >>host: he goes fast on the math. just for the half dollars, coin by coin not counting everybody else in there. >>guest: pretty tremendous value. these two are $110. >>host: that s
with president kennedy say he is dead of bullet wounds. there is no further confirmation, but this is what we have on a flash basis from the associated press. two priests were called to the hospital to administer the last rites of the roman catholic church and it is from them we get the word that the president has died, that the bullet wounds inflicted on him as he rode in a motorcade through downtown dallas have been fatal. >> welcome back to "morning joe." that was bill ryan on november 22nd, 1963, announcing to the world that president john f. kennedy has been assassinated in a motorcade passing through dallas. >> this year, thanksgiving once again, fell on the anniversary of that terrible day. and we spoke about it with chris matthews, whose book, "jack kennedy: elusive hero," is a best seller, and of course, now, out in paperback. you, of course, your book calls him an elusive hero. i'm struck by the quote that ted sorenson, his close friend and legendary speechwriter said about him. it sounds so much like what people say about reagan, still. i never knew everything about him. no one did
civil rights bill was not enough. president kennedy took the position that if a person had a sixth grade education, that person should be considered literate and should able to register to vote. those of us in the student nonviolent coordinating committee took the position that the only qualification for being able to register to vote in america should be that of age and residency, nothing more or anything less. we wanted a much stronger bill. but the whole idea of the march was not to support a particular piece of legislation. it was a march for jobs and freedom. it was a coalition of conscience to say to the congress and say to the president of the united states, "you must act." we didn't think that the proposed bill was commensurate to all of the suffering, to the beatings, to the jailing, to the killing that had occurred in the south. amy goodman: congressman john lewis. he's just written a new book called across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change. i'll continue the interview with him in a moment. [break] amy goodman: "ain't gonna let nobody turn me round," the sncc fr
to the democrat roger naacp. >>host: mary frances berry how did the administration change with the kennedy and johnson administration? >>guest: i then called the chapter about friends among friends because the commissioners all said he is a good solid democrats and now was the time. they did not know the bad bobby kennedy that i call him then, they were making fun of the commission. they are recommending this? there were not hostile to civil rights. the problem was the committees of congress were controlled by democrats from the south. mcclellan, and mississippi, they control the judiciary committee and judicial appointments. so it has been a friendly reception. but the administration would take the recommendations to incorporate them later on but intel and they were simply being polite that these people think we will do this. we cannot do this. so they found out they tried to cooperate but the independence that made them the independent voice was important and they should not try to be friendly. their job was to be a watchdog and they learned that than kennedy was assassinated and then be
in space. just over 3 nonts into his presidency john f. kennedy like millions of other americans across the country was glued to his television. >> he became an instant hero that they needed. >> jfk his sights set on beating the soviets had advice from the top engineers one was beamed rocket scientist. >> huntsville alabama president kennedy begins a two-day tour of u.s. space centers. >> i read a letter from warner von brawn he wrote to kennedy when he said how can we beat the russians, his letter basically said we can't beat them anywh e anywheres except to be the first on the moon. >> the president made a dramatic announcement before joint session of the congression. >> i believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal before this decade is out of landing a man on the moon and bring him safely to the earth. >> we went to the moon to stick a flag on the moon before the russians did. >> we didn't have the cold war would kennedy have had the same zeal? >> no. >> to have something that would show america's responsibility to a challenge and do it in full open and peaceful
. horses ander bayonets. chris: was it this zinger in the vice presidential debate. >> jack kennedy. >> now you're jack kennedy. chris: these aren't the best of all time. >> i like the navy one and i know -- chris: the bayonets and horses. >> the white house had been prepared for that one because mechanism was using the line about the navy being smaller now. chris: one of his biggest advisers, former secretary of the navy, 600-ship navy. >> so they were prepared for it and put that line in there just waiting and it was so funny, i was there for that debate and the second mitt romney said what he did, a lot of the reporters trying to groans baud they knew what was coming. >> i like the zinger from the president. the one i like was on the david letterman show. letterman says you and mitt romney don't like each other, why not? and he said, when we were kids together in kenya growing up and that kind of humor really makes an impact on people because they like it. chris: it's self deprecating, taking the biggest charge against you. >> i'm going with the kerry. the setup thing was terrible but wh
on the kennedy center stage in the show. go of the show's stars are here. guys, how can you describe that first supergroup coming together? >> i think it's a malange of wildness and abandon and rock n' roll. >> for those that don't know the story, they call came together in this spontaneous jam session in memphis, tennessee? >> yeah. >> in 1956? >> yeah. it was a recording session, actually and jerry lieu lewis was hired to play the piano. johnny cash was in town. elvis was in town and they stopped by and it turned into a jam session. it was so impromptu that the tape was kept running. you can get the originals so we dramatized the night. >> it's a fun perspective of what could have happened if these monsters had stayed together, imagine. >> yeah. >> so martin, you play jerry lee lewis and he's the last living member of the million dollar quartet. what is it like to play that icon's role? >> it's amazing. not a lot of people know what he looks like or really a lot about him but, i'm wild on stage and it's the most fun role to play. it's so much fun. i just get to be wild and crazy. >> you get t
is always -- the most best to look at. and there's even talk that vicky kennedy, senator ted kennedy's widow, i'm told, might temporarily fill the seat. she's not interested in running for it, but i am told by a democrat that she would consider temporarily filling it until there is an election for a permanent replacement. >> a kennedy or ben affleck. that will be an interesting run there. >> a lot of options. >> all right. thank you. >> president obama nominating senator john kerry for secretary of state. that is happening in the next hour and 1:30 p.m. eastern and kerry would replace hillary clinton as she steps down from the post and we'll have that announcement as soon as it starts and that will be live at 1:30. in newtown, connecticut, was there a moment of silence. the ringing of the bells. [ bells ] >> church bells rang out in honor of those killed a week ago when a gunman burst into sandy hook elementary school. 20 children and six adults died at the school. the gunman also killed his mother and himself. governors in at least 29 states called for a moment of silence in honor of the vi
about jack kennedy and i remember looking at it and it was very much exploring the area of the women and all that kind of stuff. and i was aware that this was such -- because you're now dealing with fact and mythology and dealing with the american psyche and what he represents and the darker side and what it could do and open up, i just thought this is too much for me. and also it has to be handled -- i didn't think that every brodget that's been around, i don't think anyone has been able to hand that will in a way i would feel comfortable getting involved in. because you are opening up a massive can of worms there and all the ramifications of it. and the idea of people in high ranking positions and adulterous affairs is still very current. and they would be something valid and exciting about getting involved in exploring that issue but you are starting to tinker with things that are -- you start to wake a dragon and if you don't feel like you have the machine in place to deal with that, then it's like -- it can the danger zone. i remember when i was at drama school and have you acti
was happy until this. >> you've got "killing kennedy," "killing lincoln." what's the next one? >> "killing colbert." well, i had no choice but to launch "operation killing killing kennedy" to knock o'reilly's book from the top spot. and nation, you did it. yesterday "america again" hit number one on amazon! wooooooooo! [cheers and applause] literally -- literally read it and weep, bill! this is huge. "killing kennedy" has been on the amazon charts for ten weeks! nine weeks longer than it took him to write it. [ laughter ] not only did "america again" beat out "killing kennedy," it also beat out the kinky, psychosexual novel "fifty shades of grey" due, i'm sure, to my book's graphic depictions of depraved sadomasochistic sex. [ laughter ] once again, my apologies to doris kearns goodwin. [ laughter ] as for papa bear, i have so crushed my hero, i look forward to his next book "killing a fifth of bourbon in a puddle of my own tears" by bill o'reilly but my book is not the only thing that has captured the imagination of america. the country is gripped by the prospect that i will be appointed
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